Benefits of strawberry

Heart health

Heart disease is the most common cause of death worldwide.

Studies have found a relationship between berries — or berry anthocyanins — and improved heart health.

Large observational studies in thousands of people link berry consumption to a lower risk of heart-related deaths .

According to a study in middle-aged people with well-established risk factors for heart disease, berries may improve HDL (good) cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood platelets function .

Strawberries may also :

  • improve blood antioxidant status
  • decrease oxidative stress
  • reduce inflammation
  • improve vascular function
  • improve your blood lipid profile
  • reduce the harmful oxidation of LDL (bad) cholesterol

The effects of freeze-dried strawberry supplements on type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome have been studied intensely — mainly in overweight or obese individuals.

After 4–12 weeks of supplementing, participants experienced a significant decrease in several major risk factors, including LDL (bad) cholesterol, inflammatory markers, and oxidized LDL particles.

Blood sugar regulation

When carbs are digested, your body breaks them down into simple sugars and releases them into your bloodstream.

Your body then starts secreting insulin, which tells your cells to pick up the sugar from your bloodstream and use it for fuel or storage.

Imbalances in blood sugar regulation and high-sugar diets are associated with an increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Strawberries seem to slow down glucose digestion and reduce spikes in both glucose and insulin following a carb-rich meal, compared to a carb-rich meal without strawberries .

Thus, strawberries may be particularly useful for preventing metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

Cancer prevention

Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells.

Cancer formation and progression is often linked to oxidative stress and chronic inflammation .

A number of studies suggest that berries may help prevent several types of cancer through their ability to fight oxidative stress.

Strawberries have been shown to inhibit tumor formation in animals with mouth cancer and in human liver cancer.

The protective effects of strawberries may be driven by ellagic acid and ellagitannins, which have been shown to stop the growth of cancer.

More human research is needed to improve the understanding of the effects of strawberries on cancer before any solid conclusions can be reached.

Adverse effects

Strawberries are usually well tolerated, but allergy is fairly common — especially in young children.

Strawberries contain a protein that can cause symptoms in people who are sensitive to birch pollen or apples — a condition known as pollen-food allergy

Common symptoms include itching or tingling in the mouth, hives, headaches, and swelling of the lips, face, tongue, or throat, as well as breathing problems in severe cases .

The allergy-causing protein is believed to be linked to strawberries’ anthocyanins. Colorless, white strawberries are usually well tolerated by people who would otherwise be allergic.

Furthermore, strawberries contain goitrogens that may interfere with the function of the thyroid gland in people with thyroid problems.

Maintain your healthy vision

The antioxidant properties in strawberries may also help to prevent cataracts — the clouding over of the eye lens — which can lead to blindness in older age. Our eyes require vitamin C to protect them from exposure to free-radicals from the sun’s harsh UV rays, which can damage the protein in the lens. Vitamin C also plays an important role in strengthening the eye’s cornea and retina.

While high doses of vitamin C have been found to increase the risk of cataracts in women over 65, researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm note that the risk pertains to vitamin C obtained from supplements, not the vitamin C from fruits and vegetables.

 

Keep your wrinkles at bay

The power of vitamin C in strawberries continues, as it is vital to the production of collagen, which helps to improve skin’s elasticity and resilience. Since we lose collagen as we age, eating foods rich in vitamin C may result in healthier, younger-looking skin. But vitamin C isn’t the only naturally-occuring wrinkle fighter found in this fruit. Researchers at Hallym University in the Republic of Korea concluded that ellagic acid visibly prevented collagen destruction and inflammatory response — two major factors in the development of wrinkles — in human skin cells, after continued exposure to skin-damaging UV-B rays.  

Reduce pesky inflammation

 

The antioxidants and phytochemicals found in strawberries may also help to reduce inflammation of the joints, which may cause arthritis and can also lead to heart disease. A study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health shows that women who eat 16 or more strawberries per week are 14 percent less likely to have elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) — an indication of inflammation in the body.  

The antioxidants and phytochemicals found in strawberries may also help to reduce inflammation of the joints, which may cause arthritis and can also lead to heart disease. A study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health shows that women who eat 16 or more strawberries per week are 14 percent less likely to have elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) — an indication of inflammation in the body.  

Boost your fibre intake

Fibre is a necessity for healthy digestion, and strawberries naturally contain about 2 g per serving. Problems that can arise from lack of fibre include constipation and diverticulitis — an inflammation of the intestines, which affects approximately 50 percent of people over 60. Fibre can also aid in fighting type 2 diabetes. “Fibre helps slow the absorption of sugars (i.e., glucose) in the blood,” says Edwards. “As a result, adults who are managing diabetes can enjoy strawberries — in moderation — in their diet.

Aid in weight management

 

Maintaining a healthy weight is one of the best defenses against type 2 diabetes and heart disease, not to mention just plain good for your overall well-being. “Strawberries are naturally low in calories (around 28 calories per serving), fat-free and low in both sodium and sugar,” says Edwards. “Strawberries do contain natural sugars, though total sugars are fairly low with 4 grams per serving — and the total carbohydrate content is equivalent to less than a half slice of bread. Triple your serving to 1.5 cups and you’ll have a snack that’s less than 100 calories and much healthier than those pre-packaged 100-calorie snacks!” Add strawberries to one of these low-cal smoothie recipes and you’ll have the perfect breakfast or snack.

 Help to promote pre-natal health

Folate is a B-vitamin recommended for women who are pregnant or trying to conceive, and strawberries are a good source with 21 mg per serving. Folate is necessary in the early stages of pregnancy to help in the development of the baby’s brain, skull and spinal cord, and the folic acid in strawberries may help to prevent certain birth defects, such as spina bifida.

Hope you all loved my topics and more upcoming topics are there.

Till then stay tuned.

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