Hear me out about Triathlons

triathlon is an endurance consisting of swimming , cycling and running over various distances. Triathletes compete for fastest overall completion time, racing each segment sequentially with the time transitioning between the disciplines included.

The sport has its roots in multi-event races held in France during the 1920s, with more specified rules and races forming during the late 1970s as sports clubs and individuals developed the sport. This history has meant that variations of the sport were created and still exist, it also lead to other three stage races to use the name triathlon despite not being continuous or not consisting of swim bike and run elements.

Triathletes train to achieve endurance, strength, speed, requiring focused persistent training for each of the three disciplines, as well as combination workouts and general strength conditioning.

HISTORY OF TRIATHLONS :

The evolution of triathlon as a distinct event is difficult to trace with precision. Many, including triathlon historian and author Scott Tinley , consider events in early twentieth century France to be the beginnings of triathlon, with many three element multisport events of differing composition appearing all called by different names.

Race formats

NameSwimBicycleRunNotes
Kids of Steel100–750 m
(110–820 yd)
5–15 km
(3.1–9.3 mi)
1–5 km
(0.62–3.11 mi)
Distances vary with age of athlete.
Novice (Australia)300 m
(330 yd)
8 km
(5.0 mi)
2 km
(1.2 mi)
Standard novice distance course is called  triathlons.
3–9–3 (New Zealand)300 m
(330 yd)
9 km
(5.6 mi)
3 km
(1.9 mi)
Standard novice distance course in New Zealand.
Super Sprint400 m
(0.25 mi)
10 km
(6.2 mi)
2.5 km
(1.6 mi)
Standard Super Sprint course.
Novice (Europe)400 m
(0.25 mi)
20 km
(12 mi)
5 km
(3.1 mi)
Standard novice/fitness distance course in Europe.
Sprint750 m
(0.47 mi)
20 km
(12 mi)
5 km
(3.1 mi)
Half Olympic distance. For pool-based races, 500 m (1,300 or 1,600 ft) swim is common.
Olympic1.5 km
(0.93 mi)
40 km
(25 mi)
10 km
(6.2 mi)
Also known as “international distance”, “standard course”, or “short course”.
Triathlon 70.31.9 km
(1.2 mi)
90 km
(56 mi)
21.1 km
(13.1 mi)
Also known as “middle distance”, “70.3” (total miles traveled), or “half-ironman”.
Long Distance (O2)3.0 km
(1.9 mi)
80 km
(50 mi)
20 km
(12 mi)
Double Olympic distance of the 2007 and 2009.
Triathlon 140.63.9 km
(2.4 mi)
181 km
(112 mi)
42.2 km
(26.2 mi)
Also known as “long distance”, “full distance”, “140.6” (total miles traveled).
Long Distance (O3)4.0 km
(2.5 mi)
120 km
(75 mi)
30 km
(19 mi)
So-called triple Olympic Distance, distance of the 2016

Race organization format

In general, participation in a triathlon requires an athlete to register and sign up in advance of the actual race. After registration, racers are often provided a race number, colored swim cap , and, if the event is being electronically timed, a timing band. Athletes will either be provided or briefed on details of the course, rules, and any problems to look out for traffic lights. At a major event, such as a long course championship, triathletes may be required to set up and check-in their bike in the transition area a day or two before the race start, leaving it overnight and under guard.

On the day of the race, before the start of competition, athletes will generally be provided with a bike rack to hold their bicycle and a small section of ground space for shoes, clothing, etc. in the transition area. In some triathlons, there are two transition areas, one for the swim/bike change, then one for the bike/run change at a different location.

Triathlons are timed in five sequential sections:

  1. from the start of the swim to the beginning of the first transition (swim time);
  2. from the beginning of the first transition to the end of the first transition (T1 time);
  3. from the start of the cycling to the end of the cycling leg (cycling time);
  4. from the beginning of the second transition to the end of the second transition (T2 time);
  5. finally from the start of the run to the end of the run, at which time the triathlon is completed.

Triathlon and fitness

Triathletes competing in the swim component of race. Wetsuits are common but not universal

Participants in triathlon often use the sport to improve or maintain their wellness. With each sport being an endurance event, training for a triathlon provides vascular and cardio exercise benefits. Additionally, triathletes encounter fewer injuries than those who only use running as part of their exercise routine due to the incorporation of low impact swim and bike training.

Triathletes spend many hours training for competitions, like other endurance event participants. There are three components that have been researched to improve endurance sports performance; aerobic capacity, lactate threshold, and economy. Injuries that are incurred from long hours of a single activity are not as common in triathlon as they are in single sport events. The  effect that athletes achieve from training for one sport by doing a second activity applies to triathlon training. Additional activities that triathletes perform for cross-training benefits are yoga, Pilates , and weight training.

Hey loves hopes you all found this article adventurous and interesting. Do tell me if you are a part of it also or not? Would be happy to know from you as well. Do let me know in the comments section down below how did you find this article and also like my post. For more such posts stay tuned. With love fitninch.

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s